Porokeratosis and Methods of Treatment

August 12, 2010

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Porokeratosis comes in several name variations known in the medical world. These include senile keratosis, senile warts, seborrheic verruca, barnacles, brown warts, and basal cell papilloma. As a clonal keratinization disorder, porokeratosis shows up as a cornoid lamella. A cornoid lamella is made up of parakeratotic cells that are stacked tightly to one another, and is seen spread over the stratum corneum.

Five variants of this keratinization disorder exist. To enumerate these variations, they are: punctate porokeratosis, disseminated superficial actinic porokeratosis, classic porokeratosis of Mibelli, porokeratosis palmaris et plantaris disseminate, and linear porokeratosis. In the United States, disseminated superficial actinic porokeratosis is fairly common. In comparison to disseminated superficial actinic porokeratosis, the other forms of porokeratosis rarely happen.

The people who are the most prone to porokeratosis are fair-skinned individuals. Porokeratosis is actually rather rare among darker-skinned individuals.

Porokeratosis palmaris et plantaris disseminate as well as classic porokeratosis of Mibelli happen twice as much in men than in women. Disseminated superficial actinic porokeratosis happens 3 times as much in women compared with men. On the other hand, linear porokeratosis occurs in men just as much as it does in women.

With regards to the statistics when it comes to age, porokeratosis palmaris et plantaris disseminate and linear porokeratosis can appear at any age. Meanwhile, classic porokeratosis of Mibelli usually begins to develop starting from childhood. Between 30-40, adults are typically prone to disseminated superficial actinic porokeratosis.

What causes porokeratosis? Porokeratosis may occur because of sun exposure, ultraviolet light exposure, immunosuppression, therapeutic phototherapy, radiation therapy, and genetic inheritance. A study showed that ten percent of renal transplant patients later developed the skin condition.

Patients of porokeratosis have to make sure that they avoid any unnecessary exposure to the sun. They must remember to don protective clothing against the sunlight and put on sunblock.

Porokeratosis treatment can be done through many ways. Treatment for this disorder must be individualized. Doctors base the kind of treatment on the patient’s preference, the functional and aesthetic considerations, the size of the lesion, the lesion’s anatomical location, and the risk of malignancy.

For many people affected by porokeratosis, appropriate protection from the sun and the regular use of emollients may be all that is necessary. Patients must also keep a look out for any indications of malignant degeneration.

Another method for porokeratosis treatment is surgical care. Lesions that have become malignant as time has progressed need surgery to be performed on them. The most appropriate surgical modality for malignant degeneration is excision. Other methods used to treat for porokeratosis include laser therapy, diamond fraise dermabrasion, electrodesiccation, cryotherapy, and curettage.

{ 2 comments… read them below or add one }

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